Category: Uncategorized

Customer Homes – @stylewithmuse

Katherine and Ollie recently bought their first home together and have begun a big renovation to turn the 1930s property into the home of their dreams. After comparing lots of herringbone floor samples, the couple decided our Deluxe Brushed Suede Herringbone Click Vinyl was the one for them!


hammer and wooden flooring plank icon

Floor used in this project:
Deluxe Brushed Suede

Why did you choose Luxury Flooring?

We had decided we wanted to fit the flooring ourselves, with the help of our local handyman, so we searched for the best priced flooring online (and the prettiest colour), and after receiving a lot of samples, Luxury Flooring turned out to be the perfect fit! We were looking for a light oak colour with a slightly ash tone, without being grey, and Brushed Suede ticked all the boxes.

What was most important to you when designing your room?

We wanted to create a bright open space, where there was a clean line of sight from the front door, all the way through to the kitchen and garden. Having that view when you walk through the front door was key to the vision we had for our home and it was therefore important that the flooring contributed to the seamless flow we wanted  to create. I knew that Herringbone flooring would be the ideal choice to achieve this look.

What’s your story?

This is the first house we have bought together, and our first renovation. Although we were looking for a project, we didn’t really plan to do as much as we ended up doing. It kind of just happened, one day we had a kitchen, the next day, we had no wall on the back of the house… We both had the same vision for the house (luckily), and ideas just seemed to slot into place as we went along. It’s been a long journey and we still have lots to do, but it is definitely on its way to becoming our dream home.

What does your home situation look like?

It’s just the two of us at the moment, but who knows what the future holds!

How do you prepare your home before hosting?

Cleaning, of course –  I have to make sure all the carpet has hoover lines, and obviously a new candle or two!

Which rooms do you use for hosting?  

The kitchen/diner is always used for hosting; we wanted to create a space for that exact reason and it’s proven to be a great success. I initially thought I would be nervous having people in our newly renovated home, but it actually feels very natural for people to use the space, and the flooring has been so easy to keep clean!

What qualities were you looking for in your new flooring?  

I wanted a floor that felt and looked like hardwood flooring, without the cost – something that looked like it belonged in the amazing homes I see on Instagram!

  

Have you ever had a ‘panic moment’ with your floor while entertaining? If so, how did you handle it? 

The rule during the housewarming was no red drinks – a few drinks were spilt but luckily they all cleaned up perfectly.

What advice would you give to someone looking to transform their floor?

Prep, prep and more prep – making sure we had prepared our concrete floor/floorboards well made the process of fitting the floor simple and created a great finish.

How has your floor improved your home?  

We absolutely love the flooring, it’s exactly the colour and style we had dreamed of when imagining our home. I think the flooring adds colour and texture to the rooms, whilst being in-keeping with the neutral theme.


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Options for Finishing your Floor Yourself

When it comes to finding the perfect floor for your home, you may not find the exact look you want in a finished product. If you’re someone who loves to add those final touches to your own home, you may want to choose an unfinished floor so you can create a look you love. 

Even a finished hardwood or engineered wood floor can be refinished. After many years of use, you may want to update the look of your floor to complement your home’s decor, repair cosmetic damages or extend the lifetime of the floor.

Unfinished floors must be finished as the oil or lacquer provides vital protection for your new floor, while making it look beautiful.

What Options are there for floor finishes?

There are three main options for floor finishes: oiled, lacquered and invisible oil. We’ve broken them down to give you a little extra help!

Oiled

Oiled floors have a great natural look, as the oil soaks into the wood rather than sitting on top of the flooring. The oil gives the floor a matte finish, making the wood look even more authentic. If you want to enhance the natural beauty of the wood floor you’ve chosen,  oil is a great option. 

Oil also benefits from being easier to refinish, as you can sand and re-oil parts of the wood without having to refinish the entire floor.

Lacquered

A lacquer will give a more glossy finish as it sits on top of the floor. This means it has a higher level of protection compared with oil, as it forms a protective surface. Lacquers also have the ability to change the appearance of the floor more than oil, with endless shades and tones to choose from.

Invisible Oil

Invisible oil is the best option if you want the wood to maintain its appearance. This is a clear oil which has minimal impact on colour and sheen, while still protecting the floor.

Can you Refinish Hardwood Floors Yourself?

Finishing or refinishing floors is a big task, but with a bit of DIY experience, the right tools and a can-do attitude you’ll be surprised by what you’re capable of! 

Refinishing a floor will take slightly longer than if you finish a new floor, as refinishing will require you to sand your floor. However, when finishing a new floor, you’ll also need to account for the time taken to lay the flooring. 

You’ll want to make sure you have some time spare – ideally a long weekend – to get the work done. With furniture moving, sanding and drying times, finishing or refinishing a floor can be time-consuming.

What Product to Use to Refinish Hardwood Floors?

There are a number of great products on the market to use on your floors. Since we know there are plenty of existing products out there, we’ve chosen not to sell our own. Our recommendation is the Osmo brand of oils and lacquers – they’re made with natural ingredients and we’ve seen amazing results from them time and again. 

When it comes to choosing the shade you want, you should consider the colour scheme of your space and whether you want a lighter or darker look. If you’re finishing an unfinished floor, you can use leftover samples or offcuts to test colours and shades before committing to a final look. Alternatively, when refinishing, you can test colours on small patches of floor that will be hidden underneath furniture.

How to Refinish a Floor

When it comes to refinishing a floor, there’s a little more work to do. Firstly, you’ll have to sand the floor. A random orbital sander will give the best results as you’ll have more control over the work you’re doing and it’ll provide a more natural finish. 

Then, you can apply your oil or lacquer. Make sure to follow the manufacturer’s instructions and take any necessary safety precautions.

FAQs

How often should you sand floors?

To preserve the life of your floors, you should sand and refinish them. We recommend doing this every 10 years, but you can do it more frequently if you’d like to update the style.

How many times can a floor be sanded?

This depends on the type and thickness of the floor. Engineered wood with a thin wood veneer should not be sanded, but a thicker one may be sanded two or three times. Check the manufacturer’s guidelines before planning your project. 

Solid wood flooring can be sanded more times, although the number also depends on the thickness of the wood. You may be able to refinish your floor up to 12 times!

Is it cheaper to refinish floors or replace?

New solid wood flooring is an investment and in most cases it will be much cheaper to refinish your floors. Not only that, but mending and upkeeping your floors is much more environmentally friendly. 


Hopefully this blog has helped answer your floor finishing questions, but if you need any further help, just get in touch with our friendly flooring experts.  

Don’t forget to follow us on Instagram and tag us in your flooring transformation posts #MyLuxuryFloor. We can’t wait to see your new floor in action! 

The post Options for Finishing your Floor Yourself appeared first on Blog & Advice Centre – Luxury Flooring & Furnishings.

This post appeared first on https://www.luxuryflooringandfurnishings.co.uk

Support for Simon on the Streets on World Kindness Day

If you haven’t heard of World Kindness Day, it’s pretty much what it sounds like; an international day that encourages us all to be a little bit kinder to each other. Established in 1998 by the World Kindness Movement, World Kindness Day is celebrated every year on 13th November.  

We considered several options for spreading kindness amongst our customers; a surprise discount code, an exciting giveaway or even some hidden treats in our sample packs – after all, who doesn’t like a good freebie!   

But after thinking on it some more, we agreed it was the perfect opportunity to give back to those in need.  

Having recently partnered with homeless charity, Simon on the Streets, we were very aware of their incredible work supporting people in West Yorkshire who are homeless and struggling. Knowing that their fantastic fundraising team are always in need of help, we felt there was no one better to support. 

We pledged to donate 5% of the cost of every order we received on 13th November 2023, in honour of World Kindness Day.  

The amount raised was revealed in early December and we were delighted to be able to give a total of £3,650!  

We received a lovely response from the fundraising team at Simon on the Streets, who said, “Wow, what an absolutely incredible donation towards the Christmas Appeal. That will make a huge difference to our charity and the whole team at Simon on the Streets sends their gratitude to everyone at Luxury Flooring and Furnishings 😊” 

As we begin another year, we’re still committed to supporting Simon on the Streets as much as we can. Whether we’re lacing up our trainers for a sponsored run or tucking into some tasty treats at a bake sale, we can’t wait to see how much more we can raise in 2024! 

To find out more about Simon on the Streets and the fantastic work they’re doing, go to https://www.simononthestreets.co.uk/   

The post Support for Simon on the Streets on World Kindness Day appeared first on Blog & Advice Centre – Luxury Flooring & Furnishings.

This post appeared first on https://www.luxuryflooringandfurnishings.co.uk

How to Lay Solid Wood Flooring


Jump straight to:
> Tools You’ll Need
> Your Installation Options
> Preparing to Fit Your Floor
> Installing Your Floor
> Finishing the Look
> Your Flooring is Finished!


or Download the guide as a PDF


hammer and wooden flooring plank icon

Tools for Fitting Your Floor

To install these floors yourself you’ll need some tools to help with the job.

Have these at hand:

  • Tape measure
  • Spirit level
  • Pencil
  • Workbench or sawhorse
  • Combination square
  • Planks of flooring
  • Spacers, Tapping block & Pull bar
  • Rubber mallet
  • Underlay and underlay tape (if needed)
  • Handsaw or electric saw
  • Chisel (for fitting around architrave)
  • Drill (for covering pipework)
  • Moisture meter – the correct type for your subfloor
  • Beading or skirting boards (to finish the look)
  • Adhesive and trowel (for gluing installation)
  • Flooring nailer (for nailing installation)
  • Safety precautions i.e. knee pads, safety goggles, dust masks, ear defenders

Your Installation Options

Our Solid Wood flooring can be installed in two different ways, so it depends on your subfloor
and what sort of method you prefer.

Note: This guide is based on straight plank solid wood flooring, so if you’re fitting parquet, please take a look at your parquet-specific guide too.

Nailing

With this method, secret nails go through the tongue to secure the planks to a wooden subfloor. Professional fitters tend to prefer this method as the result is extremely secure. You’ll need to fit a wood layer above any concrete because secret nailing cannot be done directly on top of a concrete subfloor.

Gluing

With this method, adhesive is applied to the top of the subfloor with a trowel and then the individual planks are laid on top. This is our favoured method for tongue and groove parquet flooring.

Good to know

Tongue & Groove

These boards come with a short protruding side (the tongue) and one short indented side
(the groove). These slot together like a jigsaw puzzle to form a tight fit.


Preparing to Fit Your Floor 

  1. Check the packs
    Once the flooring arrives you should check one box to make sure you’re happy with the product. Due to the nature of wooden flooring, each plank is unique so there might be some natural variation between the planks and batches. When you get to laying the floor you can make the most of these colour contrasts by mixing and matching planks from different packs to get a lovely natural look.

  2. Leave to acclimatise
    Your solid wood floor should be left for 5-7 days in the room it’s going to be fitted in. This time allows the floor to acclimatise and will reduce the risk of swelling or contracting once the floor is installed. To do this, either lay the packs on the floor or in stacks, just as long as they stay horizontal and that there’s equal weight distributed across them all. Leave the planks in their packaging but open each end to let some air in. Try to make sure the room stays at the same temperature you’d usually have it at so between 18°C – 27°C and don’t allow the floors to be exposed to the elements.
    Remember: solid wood floors cannot be fit with underfloor heating.
  3. Prepare the subfloor
    Before you lay your new floor, you’ll need to remove the existing flooring, prepare the subfloor and ensure it is clean, dry and level. We recommend a concrete or wooden subfloor for the best result. Use a moisture meter to check the subfloor is dry enough before you start. If you do have a concrete subfloor, make sure it’s completely dry before installation. A damp-proof membrane should be installed on top of the subfloor to reduce the risk of moisture reaching the solid wood boards. You’ll need to do this to prevent the wood floors from expanding and buckling. Any screws or nails in your subfloor should be fixed below the surface. Remove any old adhesive from previous floors and vacuum the floor to pick up any excess dust or debris.
  4. Plan the look
    Before you start laying your floor, take the planks from the pack and look at the natural grains and deviations in the shade. Pick out your favourites and use these planks as a focal point. Mix and match shades and patterns around these so that you can get a look you’re happy with. If there are a few planks you don’t love as much you could set these aside to use for cuts, or in areas that will be covered by furniture or rugs. Think about the direction you’d like your planks to lie. As a general rule of thumb, lay the boards against the longest wall for the best effect. If it’s a square room you might want to follow the room’s light flow, or follow on from the entrance. If you’ve gone for herringbone or parquet you can choose the direction and style of the pattern and how you want the eye to be drawn when you enter the room. The majority of our fixed length planks come with a starter plank in the pack. This is a shorter piece of wood that you should use to begin laying the pattern so that the flooring has a staggered effect. For random length planks, mix and match the lengths so you get a dappled natural look.
  5. And one last thing…
    It’s best to fit your floor as the last thing you do in a renovation project. Work your way from the top of the room to the bottom so that once you’re ready for the floor to go in, there’s much less chance of damaging it. This counts for new kitchens and islands too so always fit the floor after units have been installed rather than before. This way you’ll make sure your new floor doesn’t buckle under the weight.

Installing Your Floor  

Nailing method

  1. Before laying the boards, measure the width of the final row. You can do this by dividing the total width of the room by the width of an individual board. This will allow you to cut down the first row of boards to ensure the final row is at least 60mm wide.
  2. You can then lay the first plank in the corner of the longest wall with the groove side of the plank facing the wall. Make sure this row is perfectly straight as this will set the direction for the rest of the floor.
  3. Place spacers between the first row and the wall to create an expansion gap of 10-12mm.
  4. We recommend surface nailing the first row of boards with a nail gun to guarantee they are well secured to the wooden subfloor.
  5. Then you can lay and secret nail the new row with a powered flooring nailer or by hand with Tongue-Tite screws and a screwdriver bit. These nails will go through the tongue and into the subfloor and will be hidden when the tongue fits into the groove.
  6. Continue to stagger the joints from row to row to create a natural wood appearance.
  7. Make sure you place spacers consistently to ensure a standard gap from the sidewalls.
  8. The last row might be tricky but a pull bar and rubber mallet will help to create a tight fit. You probably won’t have much room here so, as with the first row, you should surface nail.

Gluing method

  1. Before laying the boards, measure the width of the final row. You can do this by dividing the total width of the room by the width of an individual board. This will allow you to cut down the first row of boards to ensure the final row is at least 60mm wide.
  2. Apply the adhesive 1 metre out from the longest wall before laying your first row.
  3. You should lay the first plank in the corner of the longest wall with the tongue side of the plank facing the wall. Make sure this row is perfectly straight as this will set the direction for the rest of the floor.
  4. Place spacers between the first row and the wall to create an expansion gap of 10-12mm.
  5. As you continue, ensure you place approximately 1 metre of adhesive ahead of the previous row and stagger the joints from row to row to create a natural wood appearance.
  6. Make sure you place spacers consistently to ensure a standard gap from the sidewalls.
  7. The last row might be tricky, but a pull bar and rubber mallet can help to create a tight fit.
  8. Leave the floor for 24 hours before moving furniture back into the room or walking on it.

Finishing the Look

To fit your solid wood floor around any pipes, first mark the position of the pipe in the board you’re
using. Drill a hole in this position and make two angled cuts with a saw. These cuts should form a wedge
from the edge of the board to the hole which can then be removed. Fit the board around the hole and
then reattach this wedge with glue behind the pipe so the plank looks intact.

For fitting around door frames, start by removing the door from the frame. Line up an offcut of flooring along with a threshold bar stacked on top to make sure it will fit underneath the architrave. If needed, use a handsaw and chisel to trim the bottom of the architrave to the correct height. You may also need to trim the bottom of the door before refitting.

You can then use matching beading and thresholds to cover expansion gaps and blend the new floors in with your existing walls, making it look professional and seamless. Make sure not to attach any trims to the flooring itself or it may affect the expansion gaps.

Any spare planks or cuttings can be kept in case any repairs need to be made.

If the expansion gap has been left too large and the skirting or moulding doesn’t cover it, you can use
spare floorboards to cut strips using a hand saw and glue these strips into place.

Forgotten something? It’s not too late to order these…

Your Flooring is Finished!

After putting in the finishing touches (like our range of beautiful radiator pipe covers, skirting boards, stair nosing, and door profiles), you can introduce your furniture, stand back and take it all in. You just fitted your very own Luxury Floor!

We’d love to see your accomplishments! So make sure you take plenty of pictures and post them online
@luxuryflooringfurnishings on Instagram. Tag us #MyLuxuryFloor

We hope you’re happy with your new Solid Wood Flooring but if you have any questions or issues, don’t hesitate to check out our advice centre or get in touch with our customer support team on 0333 577 0025.

The post How to Lay Solid Wood Flooring appeared first on Blog & Advice Centre – Luxury Flooring & Furnishings.

This post appeared first on https://www.luxuryflooringandfurnishings.co.uk

How to Lay Parquet Flooring


Jump straight to:
> Tools You’ll Need
> Your Installation Options
> Styles of Parquet
> Preparing to Fit Your Floor
> Installing Your Floor
> Finishing the Look
> Your Flooring is Finished!


or Download the guide as a PDF


hammer and wooden flooring plank icon

Tools for Fitting Your Floor

To install these floors yourself you’ll need some tools to help with the job.

Have these at hand:

  • Tape measure
  • Spirit level
  • Pencil
  • Chalk line
  • Workbench or sawhorse
  • Combination square
  • Planks of flooring
  • Spacers, Tapping block & Pull bar
  • Rubber mallet
  • Underlay and underlay tape (if needed)
  • Handsaw, electric saw, chop saw or Stanley knife (depending on flooring type)
  • Chisel (for fitting around architrave)
  • Drill (for covering pipework)
  • Moisture meter – the correct type for your subfloor
  • Beading or skirting boards (to finish the look)
  • Adhesive and trowel (for gluing installation)
  • Safety precautions i.e. knee pads, safety goggles, dust masks, ear defenders

Your Installation Options

Take a look at the installation guide for your type of flooring for more information but this guide shows
two options for installing parquet. If you’ve gone for tongue & groove solid or engineered wood, you can also nail the floor. Take a look at those installation guides for guidance on this.

Note: Fitting parquet flooring can be quite complicated and relies on precise measurements, so if you’re not feeling confident we do recommend you hire a professional fitter.

Floating floor

In a floating floor, the boards or tiles are joined to
each other, instead of to the subfloor. If you have a click-joining floor, floating is the way to go. For this method, we’d advise you to have underlay installed and prepped. We wouldn’t recommend floating your tongue & groove parquet floor as it won’t be as sturdy.

Gluing

With this method, adhesive is applied to the top of the subfloor with a trowel and then the individual planks are laid on top. This is our favoured method for tongue & groove parquet flooring

Good to know

Tongue & Groove

These boards come with a short protruding side (the tongue) and one short, indented side (the groove). These slot together like a jigsaw puzzle to form a tight fit.

A & B Planks

These are 2 different planks that fit together: an ‘A’ plank and a ‘B’ plank, with joins on opposing
sides. Most of our parquet comes in this form.

Click-fit

These boards simply lock into place so are easier to install. We would always recommend floating
floors for this joining method.


Styles of parquet

Parquet flooring is the term for flooring made from blocks arranged in a pattern.
This guide talks mainly about these styles:

Herringbone

The short planks are staggered to give a zig-zag effect.

Chevron

Short planks are sloped to meet in the middle, creating a clear centre line in an arrow-like pattern.

Versailles

The blocks are designed in a square shape with a pattern inside.

But you might want to customise your parquet to get patterns like these:

Double Herringbone

Basket Weave

Subway


Preparing to Fit Your Floor 

  1. Check the packs
    Once the flooring arrives you should check one box to make sure you’re happy with the product. Due to the nature of wooden flooring, each plank is unique so there might be some natural variation between the planks and batches. When you get to laying the floor you can make the most of these colour contrasts by mixing and matching planks from different packs to get a lovely natural look.

  2. Leave to acclimatise
    We know it’s tempting to get stuck into installing your new flooring as soon as it arrives but it’s important to leave it for a little while in the room it’s going to be fitted in. This time allows the floor to acclimatise and will reduce the risk of swelling, contracting or becoming brittle once the floor is installed. To do this, lay the packs on the floor or in stacks, just as long as they stay horizontal and that there’s equal weight distributed across them all. Leave the planks in their packaging. If you have a solid wood floor you should leave your packs to acclimatise for 5-7 days. For an engineered wood floor, 3-5 days will do the trick. Try to make sure the room stays at the same temperature you’d usually have it at so between 18 and 27°C and don’t allow the floors to be exposed to the elements. If you’re using underfloor heating, you’ll need to gradually increase the temperature to get the planks used to the heat. Refer to the advice given by your heating supplier on how to do this.
    Remember: solid wood floors cannot be fit with underfloor heating.
  3. Prepare the subfloor
    Before you lay your new floor, you’ll need to remove the existing flooring, prepare the subfloor and ensure it is clean, dry and level. We recommend a concrete or wooden subfloor for the best result. If you do have a concrete subfloor, make sure it’s completely dry before installation. A damp-proof membrane should be installed on top of the subfloor to reduce the risk of moisture reaching the boards. You’ll need to do this to prevent the floors from expanding and buckling (many underlays now come with built-in damp-proof membranes). Any screws or nails in your subfloor should be fixed below the surface. This is so you can be sure they won’t puncture through the underlay (if you’re using it). Remove any old adhesive from previous floors and vacuum the floor to pick up any excess dust or debris. It’s very important to have a level subfloor with parquet flooring so take extra care to make sure. Now’s the time to get your underlay down if you’re using it. Roll it out in the same direction as you’re fitting the floor and secure the rows together with tape.
  4. Plan the look
    Think about how you want your parquet floor to look. If you’ve gone for herringbone or chevron you can choose the direction and style of the pattern and how you want the eye to be drawn when you enter the room. If your flooring is solid or engineered wood, take the planks from the pack and look at the natural grooves and deviations in the shade. Pick out your favourites and use these planks as a focal point. Mix and match shades and patterns around these so that you can get a look you’re happy with. If there are a few planks you don’t love as much you could set these aside to use for cuts, or in areas that will be covered by furniture or rugs.
  5. And one last thing…
    It’s best to fit your floor as the last thing you do in a renovation project. Work your way from the top of the room to the bottom so that once you’re ready for the floor to go in, there’s much less chance of damaging it. This counts for new kitchens and islands too so always fit the floor after units have been installed rather than before. This way you’ll make sure your new floor doesn’t buckle under the weight.

Installing Your Floor  

Floating method

  1. Start by measuring the longest wall (or whichever direction you planned) and divide by two to find the centre line of the room. Use a chalk line to mark it out. You’ll be aligning the first strip of planks to this line.
  2. You may also want to add additional guide lines: a horizontal line to make sure you’re working at an exact 90 degree angle, and multiple guide lines parallel to the centre line to mark out the outer edges of each strip. Exact measurements are key for fitting parquet.
  3. Separate the planks into two separate piles. One strip of planks refers to an A and a B plank connected together and then the connected planks underneath.
  4. For herringbone flooring, align the planks so that the highest point of the entire strip is on the centre line. The pattern may look as though it is slightly to the right of the centre line (due to the nature of the pattern itself).This will look more professional once you’ve added further strips.
  5. Begin laying the planks in your chosen pattern. Lay the planks by inserting the tongue of one plank into the groove of the next.
  6. . After the first strip is complete, make sure to check all measurements and then continue to fill out the remaining strips.
  7. Once you have laid all of the full planks, you’ll need to measure and cut the planks to fill in the pattern around the edges. Make sure to leave an expansion gap at the walls using spacers. The measurement to leave will depend on your type of flooring. You can use some glue to secure the smallest pieces, applying a small amount inside the groove.

Gluing method

  1. Start by measuring the longest wall (or whichever direction you planned) and divide by two to find the centre line of the room. Use a chalk line to mark it out. You’ll be aligning the first strip of planks to this line.
  2. You may also want to add additional guide lines: a horizontal line to make sure you’re working at an exact 90 degree angle, and two guide lines parallel to the centre line to mark out the outer edges of your strip. Exact measurements are key for fitting parquet.
  3. Separate the planks into two separate piles. For chevron and herringbone, one strip of planks refers to an A and a B plank connected together and then the connected planks underneath. A Versailles strip refers to a column of connected squares.
  4. For herringbone and chevron flooring, align the planks so that the highest point of the entire strip is on the centre line. A herringbone pattern will look as though it is slightly to the right of the centre line (due to the nature of the pattern itself). This will look more professional once you’ve added further strips. For Versailles flooring, make sure the centre of the square aligns with the centre of the line.
  5. Begin by dry-laying the planks in your chosen pattern. Lay the planks by inserting the tongue of one plank into the groove of the next.
  6. We recommend dry-laying a row of planks horizontally as well, to make sure the walls are a good enough guide point. This is because not all walls are straight and can cause the floor pattern to appear tilted. Following this you should adjust as necessary, maintaining a central vertical line.
  7. Once you’re happy with the placement of your first strip, apply the adhesive with a trowel (following the adhesive instructions) and fix the planks in place, working vertically down the room in small working areas. With Versailles, start in the centre square and then fill in above and below it.
  8. Once the first strip has set, you can use this as a guide for the remaining strips.
  9. Once you have laid all of the full planks, you’ll need to measure and cut the planks to fill in the pattern around the edges. Make sure to leave an expansion gap at the walls using spacers. The measurement to leave will depend on your type of flooring.
  10. Leave the floor for 24 hours before moving furniture back to the room or walking on it.

Finishing the Look

To fit flooring around any pipes, first mark the position of the pipe in the board you’re using. Drill a hole
in this position and make two angled cuts with a saw. These cuts should form a wedge from the edge of
the board to the hole which can then be removed. Fit the board around the hole and then reattach this
wedge with glue behind the pipe so the plank appears intact.

For fitting around door frames, start by removing the door from the frame. Line up an offcut of flooring along with a threshold bar stacked on top to make sure it will fit underneath the architrave. If needed, use a handsaw and chisel to trim the bottom of the architrave to the correct height. You may also need to trim the bottom of the door before refitting.

You can then use matching beading and thresholds to cover expansion gaps and blend the new floors in with your existing walls, making it look professional and seamless. Make sure not to attach any trims to the flooring itself or it may affect the expansion gaps.

Any spare planks or cuttings can be kept in case any repairs need to be made.

If the expansion gap has been left too large and the skirting or moulding doesn’t cover it, you can use
spare floorboards to cut strips using a hand saw and glue these strips into place.

Forgotten something? It’s not too late to order these…

Your Flooring is Finished!

After putting in the finishing touches (like our range of beautiful radiator pipe covers, skirting boards, stair nosing, and door profiles), you can introduce your furniture, stand back and take it all in. You just fitted your very own Luxury Floor!

We’d love to see your accomplishments! So make sure you take plenty of pictures and post them online
@luxuryflooringfurnishings on Instagram. Tag us #MyLuxuryFloor

We hope you’re happy with your new Parquet Flooring but if you have any questions or issues, get in touch with our customer support team on 0333 577 0025.

The post How to Lay Parquet Flooring appeared first on Blog & Advice Centre – Luxury Flooring & Furnishings.

This post appeared first on https://www.luxuryflooringandfurnishings.co.uk

How to Lay Herringbone LVT (Luxury Vinyl Tiles)


Jump straight to:
> Tools You’ll Need
> Your Installation Options
> Styles of parquet
> Preparing to Fit Your Floor
> Installing Your Floor
> Finishing the Look
> Your Flooring is Finished!


or Download the guide as a PDF


hammer and wooden flooring plank icon

Tools for Fitting Your Floor

To install these floors yourself you’ll need some tools to help with the job.

Have these at hand:

  • Tape measure
  • Spirit level
  • Pencil
  • Workbench or sawhorse
  • Combination square
  • Planks of flooring
  • Spacers, Tapping block & Pull bar
  • Rubber mallet
  • Underlay and underlay tape (if needed)
  • Handsaw or electric saw
  • Chisel (for fitting around architrave)
  • Drill (for covering pipework)
  • Moisture meter – the correct type for your subfloor
  • Beading or skirting boards (to finish the look)
  • Adhesive and trowel (for gluing installation)
  • Safety precautions i.e. knee pads, safety goggles, dust masks, ear defenders

Your Installation Options

Note: Fitting parquet flooring can be quite complicated and relies on precise measurements, so if you’re not feeling confident we recommend you hire a professional fitter.

Floating floor

In a floating floor, the tiles are joined to each other, instead of to the subfloor. All of our SPC luxury vinyl tiles use this method due to their handy click-fit system. For this method, we’d advise you to have underlay installed and prepped. All of our SPC-luxury vinyl tiles have an underlay already attached which is 100% waterproof and protects against mildew, mould, rot and bacteria. Just be sure to check your subfloor is clean and smooth before fitting your floor to make sure you get the best results.

Good to know

SPC Luxury Vinyl Tiles

This type of vinyl tile has a rigid core made from limestone that’s extremely tough and strong. They
all have a click-joining system designed to be floated.

A&B Planks

These are 2 different planks that fit together: an ‘A’ plank and a ‘B’ plank, with joins on opposing
sides. Most of our herringbone flooring comes in this form, with half ‘A’ side boards and half ‘B’ side
boards in each pack.


Styles of parquet

Parquet flooring is the term for flooring made from blocks arranged in a pattern.
You can customise your parquet blocks to get patterns like these:

Herringbone

Double Herringbone

Basket Weave

Subway


Preparing to Fit Your Floor 

  1. Check the packs
    Once the flooring arrives you should check one box to make sure you’re happy with the product. Some of our wood-effect laminate flooring is designed to look just like real wood which means there may be some colour variation between the planks and batches. When you get to laying the floor you can make the most of these colour contrasts by mixing and matching planks with different shades to get a lovely natural look.

  2. Leave to acclimatise
    We know it’s tempting to get stuck into installing your new flooring as soon as it arrives but it’s important to leave it for at least 24 – 48 hours in the room it’s going to be fitted in. This allows the floor to acclimatise and makes the vinyl less brittle. To do this, lay the packs on the floor or in stacks, ensuring they stay horizontal and equal weight is distributed across them all. Leave the planks in their packaging. Try to keep the room at the same temperature you’d usually have it (around 20 – 21°C should be alright) and don’t allow the flooring to be exposed to the elements. If you’re using underfloor heating, you’ll need to gradually increase the temperature so that the planks acclimatise to the heat. Your heating supplier will be able to advise you on this.
  3. Prepare the subfloor
    Before you lay your new floor, you’ll need to remove the existing flooring, prepare the subfloor and ensure it is clean, dry and level. We recommend a concrete or wooden subfloor for the best result. Use a moisture meter to check the subfloor is dry enough before you start. If you do have a concrete subfloor, make sure it’s completely dry before installation. A damp-proof membrane should be installed on top of the subfloor to reduce the risk of moisture reaching the boards. You’ll need to do this to prevent the floors from expanding and buckling (many underlays now come with built-in damp-proof membranes). Any screws or nails in your subfloor should be fixed below the surface. This is so you can be sure they won’t puncture through the underlay. Remove any old adhesive from previous floors and vacuum the floor to pick up any excess dust or debris. It’s very important to have a level subfloor with parquet flooring so take extra care to make sure.
  4. Plan the look
    Think about how you want your herringbone floor to look. Choose the direction and style of the pattern and how you want the eye to be drawn when you enter the room.
  5. And one last thing…
    It’s best to fit your floor as the last thing you do in a renovation project. Work your way from the top of the room to the bottom so that once you’re ready for the floor to go in, there’s much less chance of damaging it. If you’re installing furniture that is extremely heavy then you might wish to glue the floor down with adhesive for extra stability.

Installing Your Floor  

Floating method

  1. Measuring the space

    Start by measuring the longest wall (or whichever direction you planned) and divide by two to find the centre line of the room. Use a chalk line to mark it out. You’ll be aligning the first strip of planks to this line. You may also want to add additional guide lines: a horizontal line to make sure you’re working at an exact 90 degree angle, and multiple guide lines parallel to the centre line to mark out the outer edges of each strip. Place spacers around the walls to make an expansion gap of 2mm. If you’re using underfloor heating, we recommend a minimum of 5mm.
  2. Laying the planks
    Separate your A and B planks into two piles. One strip of planks refers to an A and a B plank connected together and then the connected planks underneath.

Align the planks so that the highest point of the entire strip is on the centre line. The herringbone pattern may look as though it is slightly to the right of the centre line (due to the nature of the pattern itself). This will look more professional once you’ve added further strips.

To fully connect the planks cover the outer end with an offcut or a piece of card and use a rubber mallet to gently knock it until the planks sit flush against each other. Continue to connect each plank by clicking each joint into the gap of the other plank, starting at a high angle and applying light pressure. After you hear a click, lower it flat on the floor. Repeat the previous step to make sure all planks are connected as closely as possible with no gaps.

After the first strip is complete, make sure to check all measurements and then continue to fill out the remaining strips.

Once you have laid all of the full planks, you’ll need to measure and cut the planks to fill in the pattern around the edges. This is the tricky part and takes quite a bit of time to cut down all of the correct sizes and to slot them into place. You can use some glue to secure the smallest pieces, applying a small amount inside the groove.


Finishing the Look

To fit your luxury vinyl tiles around any pipes, first mark the position of the pipe in the board you’re
using. Drill a hole in this position and make two angled cuts with a saw. These cuts should form a wedge
from the edge of the board to the hole which can then be removed. Fit the board around the hole and
then reattach this wedge with glue behind the pipe so the plank appears intact.

For fitting around door frames, start by removing the door from the frame. Line up an offcut of flooring along with a threshold bar stacked on top to make sure it will fit underneath the architrave. If needed, use a handsaw and chisel to trim the bottom of the architrave to the correct height. You may also need to trim the bottom of the door before refitting.

You can then use matching beading and thresholds to cover expansion gaps and blend the new floors in with your existing walls, making it look professional and seamless. Make sure not to attach any trims to the flooring itself or it may affect the expansion gaps.

Any spare planks or cuttings can be kept in case any repairs need to be made.

If the expansion gap has been left too large and the skirting or moulding doesn’t cover it, you can use
spare floorboards to cut strips using a hand saw and glue these strips into place.

Forgotten something? It’s not too late to order these…

Your Flooring is Finished!

After putting in the finishing touches (like our range of beautiful radiator pipe covers, skirting boards, stair nosing, and door profiles), you can introduce your furniture, stand back and take it all in. You just fitted your very own Luxury Floor!

We’d love to see your accomplishments! So make sure you take plenty of pictures and post them online
@luxuryflooringfurnishings on Instagram. Tag us #MyLuxuryFloor

We hope you’re happy with your new Herringbone Luxury Vinyl Tile Flooring but if you have any questions or issues, don’t hesitate to check out our advice centre or get in touch with our customer support team on 0333 577 0025.

The post How to Lay Herringbone LVT (Luxury Vinyl Tiles) appeared first on Blog & Advice Centre – Luxury Flooring & Furnishings.

This post appeared first on https://www.luxuryflooringandfurnishings.co.uk

How to Lay Luxury Vinyl Tiles


Jump straight to:
> Tools You’ll Need
> Your Installation Options
> Preparing to Fit Your Floor
> Installing Your Floor
> Finishing the Look
> Your Flooring is Finished!


or Download the guide as a PDF


hammer and wooden flooring plank icon

Tools for Fitting Your Floor

To install these floors yourself you’ll need some tools to help with the job.

Have these at hand:

  • Tape measure
  • Spirit level
  • Pencil
  • Workbench or sawhorse
  • Combination square
  • Planks of flooring
  • Spacers, Tapping block & Pull bar
  • Rubber mallet
  • Underlay and underlay tape (if needed)
  • Handsaw or electric saw
  • Chisel (for fitting around architrave)
  • Drill (for covering pipework)
  • Moisture meter – the correct type for your subfloor
  • Beading or skirting boards (to finish the look)
  • Adhesive and trowel (for gluing installation)
  • Safety precautions i.e. knee pads, safety goggles, dust masks, ear defenders

Your Installation Options

Note: This guide is based on single plank luxury vinyl flooring, so if you’re fitting parquet, please take a look at our parquet-specific installation guide.

Floating floor

In a floating floor, the tiles are joined to each other, instead of to the subfloor. All of our SPC luxury vinyl tiles use this method due to their handy click-fit system. For this method, we’d advise you to have underlay installed and prepped. All of our SPC-luxury vinyl tiles have an underlay already attached which is 100% waterproof and protects against mildew, mould, rot and bacteria. Just be sure to check your subfloor is clean and smooth before fitting your floor to make sure you get the best results.

Good to know

SPC Luxury Vinyl Tiles

This type of vinyl tile has a rigid core made from limestone that’s extremely tough and strong. They all have a click-joining system designed to be floated and include a 1mm IXPE underlay backing.


Preparing to Fit Your Floor 

  1. Check the packs
    Once the flooring arrives you should check one box to make sure you’re happy with the product. Some of our wood-effect laminate flooring is designed to look just like real wood which means there may be some colour variation between the planks and batches. When you get to laying the floor you can make the most of these colour contrasts by mixing and matching planks with different shades to get a lovely natural look.

  2. Leave to acclimatise
    We know it’s tempting to get stuck into installing your new flooring as soon as it arrives but it’s important to leave it for at least 24 – 48 hours in the room it’s going to be fitted in. This allows the floor to acclimatise and makes the vinyl less brittle. To do this, lay the packs on the floor or in stacks, ensuring they stay horizontal and equal weight is distributed across them all. Leave the planks in their packaging. Try to keep the room at the same temperature you’d usually have it (around 20 – 21°C should be alright) and don’t allow the flooring to be exposed to the elements. If you’re using underfloor heating, you’ll need to gradually increase the temperature so that the planks acclimatise to the heat. Your heating supplier will be able to advise you on this.
  3. Prepare the subfloor
    Before you lay your new floor, you’ll need to remove the existing flooring, prepare the subfloor and ensure it is clean, dry and level. We recommend a concrete or wooden subfloor for the best result. Use a moisture meter to check the subfloor is dry enough before you start. If you do have a concrete subfloor, make sure it’s completely dry before installation. A damp-proof membrane should be installed on top of the subfloor to reduce the risk of moisture reaching the boards. You’ll need to do this to prevent the floors from expanding and buckling (many underlays now come with built-in damp-proof membranes). Any screws or nails in your subfloor should be fixed below the surface. This is so you can be sure they won’t puncture through the underlay. Remove any old adhesive from previous floors and vacuum the floor to pick up any excess dust or debris.
  4. Plan the look
    Think about the direction you’d like your planks to lie. As a general rule of thumb, lay the boards against the longest wall for the best effect. It might also be helpful to consider the shape of the room you’re going to refloor. For example, if it’s a square-shaped room, following the room’s light flow could create a beautiful effect.
  5. And one last thing…
    It’s best to fit your floor as the last thing you do in a renovation project. Work your way from the top of the room to the bottom so that once you’re ready for the floor to go in, there’s much less chance of damaging it. If you’re installing furniture that is extremely heavy then you might wish to glue the floor down with adhesive for extra stability.

Installing Your Floor  

Floating method

  1. Before laying the planks, measure the width of the final row. You can do this by dividing the total width of the room by the width of an individual plank. This will allow you to cut down the first row of planks to ensure the final row is at least 60mm wide.
  2. Place spacers between the first row and the walls to make an expansion gap of at least 2mm. If you’re using under floor heating, we recommend a minimum of 5mm.
  3. Lay the floor from left to right starting at the longest wall with the tongue part of the plank facing
    the wall.
  4. Stagger each plank by at least 30cm to create a natural look and a strong foundation. To do this, you’ll need to cut a plank at the end of each row. Ensure these planks are laid so that the cut side is facing the outside wall. Use the remainder of the previous plank to continue to stagger the joints from row to row.
  5. To fully connect the planks, cover the outer end with an offcut or a piece of card and use a rubber mallet to gently knock it until the planks sit flush against each other.
  6. After the first row, connect each plank to the previous row as well as the plank next to it. You can do this by clicking each joint into the gap of the plank in front, starting at a high angle and applying light pressure. After you hear a click, lower it flat on the floor. Repeat the previous step to make sure all planks are connected as closely as possible with no gaps.
  7. The last row might be tricky, but a pull bar and rubber mallet can help to create a tight fit.

Finishing the Look

To fit your luxury vinyl tiles around any pipes, first mark the position of the pipe in the board you’re
using. Drill a hole in this position and make two angled cuts with a saw. These cuts should form a wedge
from the edge of the board to the hole which can then be removed. Fit the board around the hole and
then reattach this wedge with glue behind the pipe so the plank appears intact.

For fitting around door frames, start by removing the door from the frame. Line up an offcut of flooring along with a threshold bar stacked on top to make sure it will fit underneath the architrave. If needed, use a handsaw and chisel to trim the bottom of the architrave to the correct height. You may also need to trim the bottom of the door before refitting.

You can then use matching beading and thresholds to cover expansion gaps and blend the new floors in with your existing walls, making it look professional and seamless. Make sure not to attach any trims to the flooring itself or it may affect the expansion gaps.

Any spare planks or cuttings can be kept in case any repairs need to be made.

If the expansion gap has been left too large and the skirting or moulding doesn’t cover it, you can use
spare floorboards to cut strips using a hand saw and glue these strips into place.

Forgotten something? It’s not too late to order these…

Your Flooring is Finished!

After putting in the finishing touches (like our range of beautiful radiator pipe covers, skirting boards, stair nosing, and door profiles), you can introduce your furniture, stand back and take it all in. You just fitted your very own Luxury Floor!

We’d love to see your accomplishments! So make sure you take plenty of pictures and post them online
@luxuryflooringfurnishings on Instagram. Tag us #MyLuxuryFloor

We hope you’re happy with your new Luxury Vinyl Tile Flooring but if you have any questions or issues, don’t hesitate to check out our advice centre or get in touch with our customer support team on 0333 577 0025.

The post How to Lay Luxury Vinyl Tiles appeared first on Blog & Advice Centre – Luxury Flooring & Furnishings.

This post appeared first on https://www.luxuryflooringandfurnishings.co.uk

How to Lay Engineered Wood Flooring


Jump straight to:
> Tools You’ll Need
> Your Installation Options
> Preparing to Fit Your Floor
> Installing Your Floor
> Finishing the Look
> Your Flooring is Finished!


or Download the guide as a PDF


hammer and wooden flooring plank icon

Tools for Fitting Your Floor

To install these floors yourself you’ll need some tools to help with the job.

Have these at hand:

  • Tape measure
  • Spirit level
  • Pencil
  • Workbench or sawhorse
  • Combination square
  • Planks of flooring
  • Spacers, Tapping block & Pull bar
  • Rubber mallet
  • Underlay and underlay tape (if needed)
  • Handsaw or electric saw
  • Chisel (for fitting around architrave)
  • Drill (for covering pipework)
  • Moisture meter – the correct type for your subfloor
  • Beading or skirting boards (to finish the look)
  • Adhesive and trowel (for gluing installation)
  • Flooring nailer or Tongue-Tite screws and screwdriver bit (for nailing installation)
  • Safety precautions i.e. knee pads, safety goggles, dust masks, ear defenders

Your Installation Options

Our Engineered Flooring can be installed in three different ways, so it depends on your joining method, the subfloor and what sort of method you prefer.

Note: This guide is based on straight plank engineered wood flooring, so if you’re fitting parquet, please take a look at your parquet-specific guide.

Floating floor

In a floating floor, the boards are joined to each other, instead of to the subfloor. If you have a click-joining floor, floating is the way to go. If not, you could still use this method by gluing the tongue and the groove joints together. Either way, we’d advise you to have underlay installed and prepped.

Nailing

With this method, secret nails go through the tongue to secure the planks to a wooden subfloor. Because of this, nailing is only suitable for tongue & groove floors, not click-fit. Professional fitters tend to prefer this method as the result is extremely secure. You’ll need to fit a wood layer above any concrete because secret nailing cannot be done directly on top of a concrete subfloor.

Good to know

Tongue & Groove

These boards come with a short protruding side (the tongue) and one short indented side (the groove). These slot together like a jigsaw puzzle to form a tight fit.

Click-fit

These boards simply lock into place so are easier to install. We would normally recommend floating floors for this joining method.

Gluing

With this method, adhesive is applied to the top of the subfloor with a trowel and then the individual planks are laid on top. This is our favoured method for tongue & groove flooring but isn’t recommended for most click-fit boards. The exception to the rule is if you’re installing your click-fit floor over underfloor heating. In this case, adhesive can help keep the floor stable with fluctuating temperatures and can reduce creaky floorboards.


Preparing to Fit Your Floor 

  1. Check the packs
    Once the flooring arrives you should check one box to make sure you’re happy with the product. Due to the nature of wooden flooring, each plank is unique so there might be some natural variation between the planks and batches. When you get to laying the floor you can make the most of these colour contrasts by mixing and matching planks from different packs to get a lovely natural look.

  2. Leave to acclimatise
    Your engineered wood floor should be left for 48 hours in the room it’s going to be fitted in. This time allows the floor to acclimatise and will reduce the risk of swelling or contracting once the floor is installed. To do this, either lay the packs on the floor or in stacks, just as long as they stay horizontal and that there’s equal weight distributed across them all. Leave the planks in their packaging but open each end to let some air in. Try to make sure the room stays at the same temperature you’d usually have it at so between 16°C – 27°C and don’t allow the floors to be exposed to the elements. If you’re using underfloor heating, you’ll need to gradually increase the temperature to get the wood used to the heat. Refer to the advice given by your heating supplier on how to do this.
  3. Prepare the subfloor
    Before you lay your new floor, you’ll need to remove the existing flooring, prepare the subfloor and ensure it is clean, dry and level. We recommend a concrete or wooden subfloor for the best results. Use a moisture meter to check the subfloor is dry enough before you start. If you do have a concrete subfloor, make sure it’s completely dry before installation. A damp-proof membrane should be installed on top of the subfloor to reduce the risk of moisture reaching the engineered boards. You’ll need to do this to prevent the wood floors from expanding and buckling (many underlays now come with built-in damp-proof membranes). Any screws or nails in your subfloor should be fixed below the surface. This is so you can be sure they won’t puncture through the underlay (if you’re using it). Remove any old adhesive from previous floors and vacuum the floor to pick up any excess dust or debris. Now’s the time to get your underlay down if you’re using it. Roll it out in the same direction as you’re fitting the floor and secure the rows together with tape.
  4. Plan the look
    Before you start laying your floor, take the planks from the pack and look at the natural grains and variations in the shade. Pick out your favourites and use these planks as a focal point. Mix and match shades and patterns around these so that you can get a look you’re happy with. If there are a few planks you don’t love as much you could set these aside to use for cuts, or in areas that will be covered by furniture or rugs. Think about the direction you’d like your planks to lie. As a general rule of thumb, lay the boards against the longest wall for the best effect. If it’s a square room you might want to follow the room’s light flow, or follow on from the entrance. The majority of our fixed length planks come with a starter plank in the pack. This is a shorter piece of wood that you should use to begin laying the pattern so that the flooring has a staggered effect. For random length planks, mix and match the lengths so you get a dappled natural look.
  5. And one last thing…
    It’s best to fit your floor as the last thing you do in a renovation project. Work your way from the top of the room to the bottom so that once you’re ready for the floor to go in, there’s much less chance of damaging it. If you have a kitchen island, this can be installed on top of the floor as long as the subfloor is level. Don’t screw the island feet directly into the floor, as this would affect the wood’s natural contractions accounted for by the expansion gaps. If you’re installing furniture that is extremely heavy then you might wish to glue the floor down with adhesive for extra stability.

Installing Your Floor  

Floating method

  1. Before laying the boards, measure the width of the final row. You can do this by dividing the total width of the room by the width of an individual board. This will allow you to cut down the first row of boards to ensure the final row is at least 60mm wide.
  2. You can then lay the first plank in the corner of the longest wall with the tongue side of the plank facing the wall. Make sure this row is perfectly straight as this will set the direction for the rest of the floor.
  3. Place spacers between the first row and the walls to make an expansion gap of 10-12mm. Expansion gaps are important for seasonal changes where the wood may expand or contract (this is usually more of an issue with solid wood products).
  4. If your planks have a click-joining method, you will be able to continue to click the boards into place. If they have a tongue & groove joining method, then glue the groove before joining it to the tongue. You can then use a rubber mallet and tapping block to ensure the tongue & groove is secure.
  5. Continue to stagger the joints from row to row to create a natural wood appearance.
  6. Make sure you place spacers consistently to ensure a standard gap from the sidewalls.
  7. The last row might be tricky, but a pull bar and rubber mallet can help to create a tight fit.

Gluing method

  1. Before laying the boards, measure the width of the final row. You can do this by dividing the total width of the room by the width of an individual board. This will allow you to cut down the first row of boards to ensure the final row is at least 60mm wide.
  2. Apply the adhesive 1 metre out from the longest wall before laying your first row.
  3. You should lay the first plank in the corner of the longest wall with the tongue side of the plank facing the wall. Make sure this row is perfectly straight as this will set the direction for the rest of the floor.
  4. Place spacers between the first row and the wall to create an expansion gap of 10-12mm.
  5. As you continue, ensure you place approximately 1 metre of adhesive ahead of the previous row and stagger the joints from row to row to create a natural wood appearance.
  6. Make sure you place spacers consistently to ensure a standard gap from the sidewalls.
  7. The last row might be tricky, but a pull bar and rubber mallet can help to create a tight fit.
  8. Leave the floor for 24 hours before moving furniture back into the room or walking on it.

Nailing method

  1. Before laying the boards, measure the width of the final row. You can do this by dividing the total width of the room by the width of an individual board. This will allow you to cut down the first row of boards to ensure the final row is at least 60mm wide.
  2. You can then lay the first plank in the corner of the longest wall with the groove side of the plank facing the wall. Make sure this row is perfectly straight as this will set the direction for the rest of the floor.
  3. Place spacers between the first row and the wall to create an expansion gap of 10-12mm.
  4. We recommend surface nailing the first row of boards with a nail gun to guarantee they are well secured to the wooden subfloor.
  5. Then you can lay and secret nail the new row with a powered flooring nailer or by hand with Tongue-Tite screws and a screwdriver bit. These nails will go through the tongue and into the subfloor and will be hidden when the tongue fits into the groove.
  6. Continue to stagger the joints from row to row to create a natural wood appearance.
  7. Make sure you place spacers consistently to ensure a standard gap from the sidewalls.
  8. The last row might be tricky but a pull bar and rubber mallet will help to create a tight fit. You probably won’t have much room here so, as with the first row, you should surface nail.

Finishing the Look

To fit an engineered floor around any pipes, first mark the position of the pipe in the board you’re using. Drill a hole in this position and make two angled cuts with a saw. These cuts should form a wedge from the edge of the board to the hole which can then be removed. Fit the board around the hole and then reattach this wedge with glue behind the pipe so the plank looks intact.

For fitting around door frames, start by removing the door from the frame. Line up an offcut of flooring along with a threshold bar stacked on top to make sure it will fit underneath the architrave. If needed, use a handsaw and chisel to trim the bottom of the architrave to the correct height. You may also need to trim the bottom of the door before refitting.

You can then use matching beading and thresholds to cover expansion gaps and blend the new floors in with your existing walls, making it look professional and seamless. Make sure not to attach any trims to the flooring itself or it may affect the expansion gaps.

Any spare planks or cuttings can be kept in case any repairs need to be made.

If the expansion gap has been left too large and the skirting or moulding doesn’t cover it, you can use
spare floorboards to cut strips using a hand saw and glue these strips into place.

Forgotten something? It’s not too late to order these…

Your Flooring is Finished!

After putting in the finishing touches (like our range of beautiful radiator pipe covers, skirting boards, stair nosing, and door profiles), you can introduce your furniture, stand back and take it all in. You just fitted your very own Luxury Floor!

We’d love to see your accomplishments! So make sure you take plenty of pictures and post them online
@luxuryflooringfurnishings on Instagram. Tag us #MyLuxuryFloor

We hope you’re happy with your new Engineered Wood Flooring but if you have any questions or issues, don’t hesitate to check out our advice centre or get in touch with our customer support team on 0333 577 0025.

The post How to Lay Engineered Wood Flooring appeared first on Blog & Advice Centre – Luxury Flooring & Furnishings.

This post appeared first on https://www.luxuryflooringandfurnishings.co.uk

Embracing the Season: Preparing Your Hardwood Floors for Fall

As the vibrant colors of summer give way to the warm and cozy hues of fall, it’s time to shift our focus from outdoor adventures to creating a comfortable and inviting indoor haven. Your hardwood floors play a pivotal role in setting the mood for the fall season. In this blog post, we’ll guide you through the essential steps to prepare your hardwood floors for fall, ensuring that they remain both beautiful and durable during this season of change.

Routine Cleaning and Maintenance

Before diving into the specific preparations for fall, it’s crucial to start with a clean slate. Begin by giving your hardwood floors a thorough cleaning. Dust and debris can accumulate over time, and it’s essential to remove them to prevent scratches and damage. Sweep or vacuum your floors to remove loose dirt and dust. Use a vacuum with a hardwood floor attachment or a soft-bristle broom to avoid scratching the surface.
Follow up with our MacMop™ and our Easy Hardwood Floor Cleaner™. Avoid excessive water, as moisture can be harmful to hardwood floors. Ensure the mop is well wrung out before use.

Check for Damages

Inspect your hardwood floors for any signs of wear or damage. This includes looking for scratches, dents, or areas where the finish may have worn off. Addressing these issues before fall sets in will help prevent further damage.

For minor scratches, you can use a touch-up kit or a wood marker pen that matches the color of your floor to conceal imperfections. For deeper scratches or gouges, it may be necessary to consult our team of professionals for repairs.

Place Mats and Rugs Strategically

One of the best ways to protect your hardwood floors during the fall season is to strategically place mats and rugs in high-traffic areas. This not only adds warmth and coziness to your space but also prevents dirt and moisture from being tracked onto your floors. Use doormats both outside and inside your entryways to capture dirt and moisture before they reach your hardwood floors. Place rugs in areas prone to spills, such as the kitchen or dining room. Ensure the rugs have a non-slip backing to prevent slipping accidents.

Use Furniture Protectors

The movement of furniture, especially chairs and tables, can cause scratches and scuffs on your hardwood floors. Consider using furniture protectors, such as felt pads or rubber caps, on the legs of your furniture to prevent damage. Check and replace any worn-out protectors regularly to ensure continued protection for your hardwood floors.

Be Mindful of Footwear

Fall often means rainy or damp weather, and wet shoes can be a hardwood floor’s worst enemy. Encourage family members and guests to remove their shoes before walking on your hardwood floors. Keep a designated area near the entryway for shoes, and provide slippers or socks for indoor use.

Regularly Trim Pets’ Nails

If you have pets, their nails can scratch the surface of your hardwood floors. Keep their nails trimmed to reduce the risk of damage. Additionally, consider placing mats or rugs in areas where your pets frequently walk or play.

Conclusion

Preparing your hardwood floors for fall is not only about preserving their beauty but also about ensuring their longevity. By following these essential steps, you can create a warm and inviting space while safeguarding your investment. Your well-maintained hardwood floors will be the perfect backdrop for the cozy moments and cherished memories that the fall season brings. So, embrace the season, and let your hardwood floors shine in all their autumn glory.

Elevate Your Business Space with Commercial Hardwood Flooring Services in Denver

When it comes to making a lasting impression in the business world, appearances matter. The flooring of your commercial space plays a crucial role in creating that impactful first impression on your clients and employees. If you’re in the Denver area and looking to elevate your business space, consider the exceptional commercial hardwood flooring services MacDonald Hardwoods has to offer. In this blog post, we will explore the benefits of choosing commercial hardwood flooring and why you should trust Macwoods for all your commercial flooring needs.

The Appeal of Commercial Hardwood Flooring

Commercial hardwood flooring is a timeless and elegant choice for any business environment. Its beauty and durability make it a favorite among business owners and interior designers alike. Here are some key reasons why commercial hardwood flooring is a smart choice for your Denver-based business:

a. Aesthetic Versatility:

One of the most significant advantages of commercial hardwood flooring is its aesthetic versatility. It can effortlessly adapt to a wide range of interior design styles, from classic to contemporary. Whether you’re aiming for a professional and polished look or a warm and inviting atmosphere, hardwood flooring can complement your vision perfectly.

b. Durability:

Denver’s bustling commercial spaces require flooring that can withstand heavy foot traffic, spills, and daily wear and tear. Commercial hardwood flooring is renowned for its durability and longevity. With proper maintenance, it can last for decades, making it a cost-effective choice in the long run.

c. Easy Maintenance:

Keeping your commercial space clean and presentable is a top priority. Hardwood flooring makes this task easier due to its smooth and sealed surface, which is resistant to dirt and stains. Regular sweeping and occasional mopping are usually all that’s required to maintain its pristine appearance.

d. Eco-Friendly:

Sustainability is a growing concern for businesses today. Commercial hardwood flooring is an eco-friendly option, as it is sourced from renewable and responsibly managed forests. Additionally, the longevity of hardwood flooring reduces the need for frequent replacements, further reducing environmental impact.

Commercial Flooring Services in Denver

Now that you understand the advantages of commercial hardwood flooring, let’s dive into the specialized services available at Macwoods to cater to your commercial flooring needs:

a. Installation:

Proper installation is crucial to ensure the longevity and performance of your commercial hardwood flooring. Our team of flooring professionals understand the unique challenges of commercial spaces and can provide expert installation services tailored to your specific needs.

b. Customization:

Every business is unique, and your flooring should reflect your brand identity. Macwoods’ Commercial flooring services in Denver offer customization options, allowing you to choose from various wood species, stains, finishes, and patterns. This customization ensures that your flooring aligns perfectly with your business’s aesthetics and requirements.

Why Choose Macwoods for Commercial Flooring Services in Denver

When it comes to commercial flooring services in Denver, MacDonald Hardwoods stands out as a trusted and experienced provider. Here’s why you should consider Macwoods for all your commercial hardwood flooring needs:

a. Expertise and Experience:

Macwoods boasts a team of seasoned professionals with years of experience in the commercial flooring industry. We understand the unique requirements of commercial spaces and have the expertise to handle any project, regardless of size or complexity.

b. Comprehensive Services:

From initial consultation to installation, Macwoods offers a comprehensive range of services to meet all your commercial flooring needs. We are committed to delivering a seamless and hassle-free experience for our clients.

c. Quality Assurance:

Our team is dedicated to delivering top-notch quality in every project we undertake. We use premium materials and the latest technology to ensure that your commercial hardwood flooring is not only beautiful but also built to last.

d. Client-Centric Approach:

Client satisfaction is at the core of Macwoods’ business philosophy. We work closely with you to understand your vision and objectives, providing personalized solutions that align with your business goals.

e. Competitive Pricing:

Macwoods offers competitive pricing without compromising on the quality of their work. We understand the budget constraints of businesses and strive to provide cost-effective solutions that meet your financial requirements.

Conclusion

In the competitive business landscape of Denver, creating a memorable and inviting commercial space is essential. Commercial hardwood flooring services in Denver offer an ideal solution to enhance your business’s appearance, durability, and eco-friendliness. With Macwoods, you can trust in their expertise, commitment to quality, and client-centric approach to deliver outstanding results.

Elevate your business space today with commercial hardwood flooring services in Denver, and experience the transformative impact of a beautiful and functional floor. Contact MacDonald Hardwoods for a consultation and take the first step towards making your commercial space stand out in the Mile High City.

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